Friday, February 4, 2011

Design 2090 - DM22 Quarter Tonner


Commissioned by Douglass & McLeod, this quarter tonner is somewhat unusual, but innovative. At first blush I suspected that they were using an existing hull mold and making changes to the sheer by adding to the deck tool. See close up below.


You can see how much freeboard was added to the height of the reverse sheer. After reviewing the technical files this is in fact a brand new hull design.

The innovations didn't stop there. Check out the keel design in the plans, below.


Here are some "Designers Comments" from the time of launch: This compact and versatile little MORC cruiser offers a logical forward step for many small boat sailors. Her removable rudder, her retractable keel, hinged mast and outboard engine tend to improve her trailer-ability. She has been designed to the Quarter Ton Rule and can be trailered to events and kept-economically-at home. Her accommodations afford generous sitting headroom.

Principal Dimensions
LOA 22'-0"
LWL 18'-9"
Beam 8'-5"
Draft 2'-9" (board up) 5'-3" (board down)
Displacement 3,500 lbs

I think the Lines Plan is worth a look. If you look at the design without the deck add-on to the freeboard it would make a handsome looking boat. No offense intended to those that own these!


6 comments:

  1. The number and types of boats that s&s designed over the years is interesting. this design would make a good pocket cruiser. Quite a bit smaller
    and lighter than the typical 1/4 ton design
    Again thanks for posting these designs from the past, I didnt know that S &S had designed such
    a huge range of boats.

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  2. To my mind there is no reverse sheer on the D&M 22. Perhaps there may said to be the flat sheer of the raised deck. I will say that viewed from the windward side, she has APPARENT reverse sheer. But neither the underlying hull's sheer, nor the raised deck possess reverse sheer. The raised deck is pretty nearly flat, fore and aft. What is effectively coaming aft is not really reverse sheer either.

    I remember when you could buy one of these new for $6,500., list price.

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  3. I take back some of my criticism of the D&M22. Actually, in college, I hitchiked up to Cleveland one day in winter and badgered the dealer there to let me do a trial sail. (my Dad had expressed an interest in moving up to the D&M 22 Quarter Tonner from his Thistle) It was blowing a gale and snowed on the way back to Wooster but I had a fantastic, unrepresentative sail with mainsail only, behind the breakwater. Stuck in the midlands of Ohio I was desperate to get on the water and I still remember the bemused, tolerant enthusiasm of the dealer, the perky little boat and a warm glow in my soul despite freezing temperatures as I thumbed my way back to landlocked Wooster.
    Funny how the right boat at the right time can work.

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  4. Well, the same Creator responsible for the bald eagle, Secretariat, and Lawrence Taylor also gave us the duck-billed platypuss, so I suppose S&S can be forgiven for this design. The turbulent wake is disturbing, but expected from a transom having any portion submerged. (Every time I look at a Vertue with the bottom four or five inches of her transom under water I wince.) And the keel/centerboard looks wrong to my eye. And what will happpen to that rudder sticking five or six inches below the keel the first time she runs aground? Unlike the wonderful CCA boats, most craft designed to the IOR have not aged very well, the DM22 being a case in point.

    Paul J. Nolan

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    Replies
    1. The rudder was not a problem it was movable up and down and in shallow water would move up. As it was about a foot longer than keep ,,,it would warn you before keep was grounded,great design

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  5. I have one of these boats and she is a remarkably good sail. I can get her up to 6.3 knots, which on an old 22' ain't half bad. I also love the flat deck. There's decent headroom below and, unlike my friends with big bubble tops, I can get on deck and move around easily without pinching into the safety rail. Running lines back to the cockpit is also easy. Maybe I'm just contrary, but I like the way she looks ;-)

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