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Monday, December 19, 2011

Design 2025 - Palmer Johnson 40


We have already discussed the Swan 40 which bears the same design number #2025. So what is this boat versus the Swan (hint: it's the very same boat)? Here's how it came to be: In the late 1960s the boatbuilder, Palmer Johnson of Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, established a brokerage division with representatives around the Unites States: New York, Chicago and Newport Beach, California, and a representative in Hants, England. Their strategy was to market a number of fiberglass sailboats under their name but built by various builders, primarily in Europe.

The PJ40 is just such a boat. The boats were in fact built by Nautor Swan and sold by PJ under their name. Eventually Nautor decided that it was no longer in their best interest to have their yachts sold through Palmer Johnson, and returned to the practice of exclusively selling the boats under their own name.

The material shown above is an advertisement form the period. The images below are from their sales literature.


Here's the general arrangement plan, identical to the Swan 40 but with the PJ name in the title block.


Principal Dimensions
LOA 39'-6"
LWL 28'-6"
Beam 10'-10"
Draft 6'-5"
Displacement 15,776 lbs
Ballast 9,200 lbs
Sail Area 706 sq ft

5 comments:

  1. Is the boat with sail number 130 on the PJ advertising Prospect of Whitby II? Are her lines the same as those of the PJ/Swan 40?

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  2. They were elegant, sea-kindly boats, with a great turn of speed and a lovely accomodation.

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  3. All the literature I find suggests that this boat actually weighed about 19,000 lbs. Why the apparent discrepancy?

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  4. Dear Blog Reader,
    Please be advised we always post the displacement to the datum waterline and therein lies the discrepancy. The boats came in a bit heavy or published data may show the displacement at half-load or other conditions.

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  5. Hi I was wondering if you have any information on these boats which may have been built in Australia as an S&S 39 in the early 70's

    ReplyDelete