Saturday, January 7, 2012

Design 1401-C1 & C2 - 37' R.O.R.C. Auxiliary Sloops


Just when we think we have identified all S&S built by Carlini of Italy, we find these two addition builds. The two boats were built in 1960. They are simple boats designed to rate under the R.O.R.C. Rule. Construction is of conventional scantlings: white oak backbone, steam bent white oak frames and single planked in mahogany with Everdur fasteners.

Please find below an updated list of Carlini built boats. We have added these two projects and we now find a total of 20 boats built by Carlini between 1956-1984. Many have been posted on this blog site. You can simply do a search in the field provided at top by either design number or boat name. Looking at the list I would hazard a guess that the boat built for Dr. Combe may have been named Kiwi, based on his second Carlini boat built two years later.

Here's the list. Please double click for zoom.


Here are the plans.


Principal Dimensions
LOA 37'-3"
LWL 25'-5"
Beam 10'-0"
Draft 5'-0"
Displacement 13,291 lbs
Ballast 4,200 lbs (outside) 200 lbs (inside)
Sail Area 590 sq ft

Friday, January 6, 2012

Image of Buzzy III - Design 1151


Speaking of six meters, it dawned on me that we have this nice image of Buzzy III, design #1151, hanging in our office. Here it is. Sorry for the reflections from the half hull models.

Design 104 - Mood


Mood was designed and built for J. Seward Johnson by Henry Nevins of City Island, New York. Johnson was a son of one of the Founders of Johnson & Johnson, the pharmaceutical company. He was a good and repeat client of the firm. Mood was to be his 3rd S&S six meter racing yacht after Jill (#16) and Jack (#30).

The boat is notable as she is not only the first S&S six meter with a reverse transom by the first S&S design with a reverse transom. Here's a look at that transom at the Nevins yard. She was launched in 1936.


The boat has been renamed a couple of times over the years. Her first name change was to Bob Kat III. She is now called Firecracker.

Here are the plans.


Principal Dimensions
LOA 35'-9"
LWL 23'-5"
Beam 6'-2"
Draft 5'-5"

Thursday, January 5, 2012

Image of Windalier - Design 1192


Last week we posted an article about Windalier, design #1192. Here's an image of her that was just found in the wrong file.

Design 2169 - Rawson 40


Here's a design that was never built. The work was commissioned by Ron Rawson, Inc. of Redmond, Washington. Rawson was known as an early pioneer in building commercial fishing vessels in fiberglass. He transitioned to yacht construction and did produce a number of models by designers such as Bill Garden, Ben Seaborn and Bill Luders. This project never got off the ground. The year was 1973.

Here's the general arrangement plan. This design has Rod Stephens' influence all over it. This was the type of boat he felt was ideal as a cruising boat, suitable for three couples and offering complete privacy for the owner.


Principal Dimensions
LOA 40'-7"
LWL 31'-0"
Beam 12'-0"
Draft 6'-8"
Displacement 23,000 lbs
Ballast 10,950 lbs
Sail Area 762 sq ft

Wednesday, January 4, 2012

More About Gemini 52 - Design 2650


Here are a couple of nice images the owner of one of the Gemini 52s, design #2650 sent us. The image files are entitled "Sarsala 22 fathoms" which leads me to beleive they were taken in the Sarsala Bay. The Sarsala Bay is located off of the Gulf of Fethiye in southwestern Turkey, just south of the Aegean Sea. They are said to be beautiful cruising grounds. It looks like an easy sail from Athens, Greece.


Thanks very much for sending these.

Tuesday, January 3, 2012

More About China Clipper - Design 1358-C3

Image ©RJLaBellaPhotos.com

Earlier in December we posted an article about China Clipper, sister to Anitra, design #1358. After a complete restoration by the craftsmen at Wooden Boatworks in Greenport, Long Island, New York she is almost as good as new. Here she is racing in the Round Shelter Island Race also known as the Whitebread Race. This was her first race for over thirty, possibly forty years.

Image ©RJLaBellaPhotos.com

Images courtesy of www.rjlabellaphotos.com. (©RJLaBellaPhotos.com). Thanks to her owner for organizing these images for us. She's a beautiful boat.

Image ©RJLaBellaPhotos.com

Design 2122 - Marionette IV


This beautiful Admiral's Cupper was constructed using cold molded epoxy techniques. Her frames are of laminated Iroko and her planking is of three layers of mahogany. She was built by McGruer & Company, Ltd. of Scotland and launched in 1972. Drafting as shown was by the very talented Toshio Kihara.

The boat is in the smaller size range for Admiral's Cup competition. The design is a development of Cervantes IV, design #2061. The layout is comfortable due to her generous beam.

Here are the plans.


Principal Dimensions
LOA 41'-2"
LWL 30'-0"
Beam 12'-0"
Draft 6'-11"
Displacement 19,969 lbs
Ballast 12,000 lbs
Sail Area 756 sq ft

Monday, January 2, 2012

More About Design 1909 - Mabelle


Here's a nice image of Mabelle, the Two-Tonner built by Sangermani in 1968. This is the cover of the Journal of the IYRU (International Yacht Racing Union) from 1970 (now know as ISAF - International Sailing Federation).

Design 2112 - Swan 44


The Swan 44 was introduced in 1972. The production run lasted until 1975 with 76 hulls built. She is one of the great classic cruiser-racers of the period and still provides a great value as a cruising boat today. Two sail plans were offered: heavy and light air, depending on intended sailing grounds.

Here's a brief article about the design.


Here are the plans.


Principal Dimensions
LOA 44'-0"
LWL 33'-11"
Beam 12'-7"
Draft 7'-2"
Displacement 23,776 lbs
Ballast 12,566 lbs
Sail Area 875 sq ft (heavy weather rig) 910 sq ft (light weather rig)

Sunday, January 1, 2012

Even More About Santana - Design 59


Last week we posted some additional information about the schooner Santana. I mentioned that she was lying in California and in perfect condition. A friend sent us these images he snapped recently at the St. Francis Yacht Club of San Francisco. The images speak for themselves.


And here's the rightfully proud owner. Congratulations Paul.


Thanks for sending these images to us.